Article Comment: Winning: A 35 Year Perspective
11/20/2014 7:18:48 AM
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Our girls' team has Molly Mearns (whose dad ran a 2:16 marathon and competed at Yale) Lauren and Sydney Ossege (whose dad ran 1:56 in the 800m and still holds our school record at HHS) and Karsen Hunter (whose dad won a state title in 1985 at HHS) Very cool to see the results you posted. It definitely has truth. Many of the top runners in the USA had parents who were olympians, etc.
Our girls' team has Molly Mearns (whose dad ran a 2:16 marathon and competed at Yale) Lauren and Sydney Ossege (whose dad ran 1:56 in the 800m and still holds our school record at HHS) and Karsen Hunter (whose dad won a state title in 1985 at HHS)

Very cool to see the results you posted. It definitely has truth. Many of the top runners in the USA had parents who were olympians, etc.
11/20/2014 10:16:20 AM
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Glasgow's 7th grader, Rebekah Howard, finished 9th in the Class A State XC meet earlier this month is the daughter of the 1984 Boy's Class A 1600m State Champion. Her father and Doug Ossege were teammates at UK during the mid 80's.
Glasgow's 7th grader, Rebekah Howard, finished 9th in the Class A State XC meet earlier this month is the daughter of the 1984 Boy's Class A 1600m State Champion. Her father and Doug Ossege were teammates at UK during the mid 80's.
11/20/2014 12:17:05 PM
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This is a very interesting topic. However, one must remember that endurance as determined by gene expression is the function of the maternal side. One doesn't have to look far for evidence of this but to one of the state's biggest assets, horse racing. Do genes play there part, sure. It would be interesting to see a deeper study of say the top 50 runners in distance races, mid-distance races, sprints races, field and see what sort of athlete's their parents were. I would say the easier connection here is if ones parent/parents are runners their child has a high likelihood of being a runner.
This is a very interesting topic. However, one must remember that endurance as determined by gene expression is the function of the maternal side. One doesn't have to look far for evidence of this but to one of the state's biggest assets, horse racing. Do genes play there part, sure. It would be interesting to see a deeper study of say the top 50 runners in distance races, mid-distance races, sprints races, field and see what sort of athlete's their parents were. I would say the easier connection here is if ones parent/parents are runners their child has a high likelihood of being a runner.
11/21/2014 4:37:35 PM
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I am from TN. My wife was a three time JUCO All American. I was just a decent OVC runner but better marathoner. My 4 kids have already shown they have great running ability. The gene theory works with them. However, my mom was unathletic and smoked like a log wagon. My dad played semi-pro baseball and was more of a speed type guy. I think it also has to do with the kids growing up around it in a positive environment.
I am from TN. My wife was a three time JUCO All American. I was just a decent OVC runner but better marathoner. My 4 kids have already shown they have great running ability. The gene theory works with them. However, my mom was unathletic and smoked like a log wagon. My dad played semi-pro baseball and was more of a speed type guy. I think it also has to do with the kids growing up around it in a positive environment.
11/23/2014 8:20:04 AM
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I know there is gene components but not every child gets some of it. I was a 4 time all-state runner 83-86 and went on to run for WKU my oldest son will be following in college this next year. My youngest son chose sports that don't require such a strong mindset. Genes are important but so is individual drive and motivation.
I know there is gene components but not every child gets some of it. I was a 4 time all-state runner 83-86 and went on to run for WKU my oldest son will be following in college this next year. My youngest son chose sports that don't require such a strong mindset. Genes are important but so is individual drive and motivation.
11/24/2014 8:30:06 AM
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Keep in mind that just because someone's parents did not run does not mean that they did not have the talent to do so. Perhaps they played another sport or had other interests and just never discovered those talents.
Keep in mind that just because someone's parents did not run does not mean that they did not have the talent to do so. Perhaps they played another sport or had other interests and just never discovered those talents.
11/24/2014 1:02:13 PM
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As much as I am sure the genetic factors are very important let's also recognize the environmental factors. The parents in these specific cases (in addition to being fast in HS) are all still involved in the sport of distance running. Many of their parents continue to run and compete, some have been involved in coaching at the youth level, and all are incredibly positive about the sport. I am also very pleased to hear that the genetic factors favor the mother! That should be very favorable for my kids if they find their way into this sport ;)
As much as I am sure the genetic factors are very important let's also recognize the environmental factors. The parents in these specific cases (in addition to being fast in HS) are all still involved in the sport of distance running. Many of their parents continue to run and compete, some have been involved in coaching at the youth level, and all are incredibly positive about the sport.

I am also very pleased to hear that the genetic factors favor the mother! That should be very favorable for my kids if they find their way into this sport ;)

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