Form USATF CEO Wants to Legalize PED's
06/14/2013 9:52:02 AM
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Doug Logan, a former CEO of USATF, now says we should stop fighting drugs in sports and legalize everything. My first thought was to wonder what he was on when he said this: [i]Regrettably, I now conclude we should give up this fight and bring the troops home. Leave the regulation of drugs to governments and their law enforcement auspices. Dismantle the drug constabulary, the “ah dahs” of this world; USADA [US Anti Doping Agency], WADA [World Anti Doping Agency], and all the others. Have those able investigators and lawyers turn their attention to the apprehension of terrorists, pedophiles, tax evaders and secret leakers. If an athlete breaks the law, throw the book at him or her and fine them or throw them in jail. If not, let everyone compete and use their best judgment as to what is, or is not, good for them. Stop treating athletes like children or even animals. Stop requiring them to be available, day or night, 24/7, to pee in a cup or give a sample of blood. Most importantly, let’s stop making a morality play out of the issue. We must stop assuming that athletic success is accompanied by doping and lying and cheating. Elect Barry Bonds to the Hall of Fame for his on-field accomplishments and let judgment of his conduct be between him and his maker. Let’s take this piece of drama out of sports and concentrate on the final score, the bar, the tape and the stopwatch.[/i]
Doug Logan, a former CEO of USATF, now says we should stop fighting drugs in sports and legalize everything. My first thought was to wonder what he was on when he said this:

Regrettably, I now conclude we should give up this fight and bring the troops home. Leave the regulation of drugs to governments and their law enforcement auspices. Dismantle the drug constabulary, the "ah dahs" of this world; USADA , and all the others. Have those able investigators and lawyers turn their attention to the apprehension of terrorists, pedophiles, tax evaders and secret leakers. If an athlete breaks the law, throw the book at him or her and fine them or throw them in jail. If not, let everyone compete and use their best judgment as to what is, or is not, good for them. Stop treating athletes like children or even animals. Stop requiring them to be available, day or night, 24/7, to pee in a cup or give a sample of blood. Most importantly, let's stop making a morality play out of the issue. We must stop assuming that athletic success is accompanied by doping and lying and cheating. Elect Barry Bonds to the Hall of Fame for his on-field accomplishments and let judgment of his conduct be between him and his maker. Let's take this piece of drama out of sports and concentrate on the final score, the bar, the tape and the stopwatch.
06/14/2013 10:38:41 AM
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@BCrumbo Perhaps I’m biased since I think that Logan was the best thing to ever happen to USATF but I’m not so sure I disagree. He does start off with “regrettably” and I think what he is trying to say is that it’s a waste of time because the war is not winnable. I don’t think he is trying to imply that PEDs are a good thing; just that he feels we will never be able to get in front of it so stop wasting time and money and move on. I sure would hate to give up on fighting PEDs but he may just be right.
@BCrumbo

Perhaps I'm biased since I think that Logan was the best thing to ever happen to USATF but I'm not so sure I disagree. He does start off with "regrettably" and I think what he is trying to say is that it's a waste of time because the war is not winnable. I don't think he is trying to imply that PEDs are a good thing; just that he feels we will never be able to get in front of it so stop wasting time and money and move on. I sure would hate to give up on fighting PEDs but he may just be right.
06/14/2013 10:47:59 AM
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[quote=BCrumbo]My first thought was to wonder what he was on when he said this[/quote] @BCrumbo I'm guessing it was a banned substance. This is crazy, and it makes me glad he's not in a position of power any longer. One assumption appears to be that while some people will use PEDs, not everyone will do so, but what he fails to realize is that legalized PED use will only escalate PED use to a degree that you would not be able to compete without them. He also seems to assume this is a "victimless crime". I'm sure the many athletes who were screwed out of prize money or medals would disagree with the victimless crime scenario though. I've got nothing but disdain for people who cheat, and wish they'd increase the penalities above and beyond what they currently implement.
BCrumbo wrote:
My first thought was to wonder what he was on when he said this


@BCrumbo
I'm guessing it was a banned substance. This is crazy, and it makes me glad he's not in a position of power any longer. One assumption appears to be that while some people will use PEDs, not everyone will do so, but what he fails to realize is that legalized PED use will only escalate PED use to a degree that you would not be able to compete without them. He also seems to assume this is a "victimless crime". I'm sure the many athletes who were screwed out of prize money or medals would disagree with the victimless crime scenario though. I've got nothing but disdain for people who cheat, and wish they'd increase the penalities above and beyond what they currently implement.
06/14/2013 12:06:43 PM
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@professor I agree that this sounds crazy but that doesn’t make him wrong, he may have a view of things that I can’t see. Cheating of any kind is an anathema to our sport, but the two fold question is: can we beat the PEDs cheaters and if so, at what cost? The most drug tested athlete in history now admits that he cheated the whole time so can we really catch most of the cheaters or are we really only catching the dumb and the unlucky and fooling ourselves into believing that all but a handful are clean. I agree with your argument that the threat of getting caught keeps some portion of the athletes from using PEDs but we have no way of knowing if we might not already be in a situation where you can’t compete at the highest level without PEDs, we just aren’t aware of it. I think many would agree that we are not winning the war on “street drugs”, even after something over 50 years and billions, maybe trillions, of dollars. A fair number of thinkers are now saying that we can’t win the war, at least the conventional way, so let’s take a different approach. One important note, Logan does not recommend making everything legal, he just recommends that this be left to the legal system and get the sports out of the business. Maybe this would be the equivalent of opening the flood gates, but then again, maybe not in the long term. Maybe we need a different approach, in my mind it's worth considering.
@professor
I agree that this sounds crazy but that doesn't make him wrong, he may have a view of things that I can't see.
Cheating of any kind is an anathema to our sport, but the two fold question is: can we beat the PEDs cheaters and if so, at what cost? The most drug tested athlete in history now admits that he cheated the whole time so can we really catch most of the cheaters or are we really only catching the dumb and the unlucky and fooling ourselves into believing that all but a handful are clean. I agree with your argument that the threat of getting caught keeps some portion of the athletes from using PEDs but we have no way of knowing if we might not already be in a situation where you can't compete at the highest level without PEDs, we just aren't aware of it.
I think many would agree that we are not winning the war on "street drugs", even after something over 50 years and billions, maybe trillions, of dollars. A fair number of thinkers are now saying that we can't win the war, at least the conventional way, so let's take a different approach.
One important note, Logan does not recommend making everything legal, he just recommends that this be left to the legal system and get the sports out of the business. Maybe this would be the equivalent of opening the flood gates, but then again, maybe not in the long term. Maybe we need a different approach, in my mind it's worth considering.
06/14/2013 12:49:30 PM
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@CoachMark What law enforcement? Most PED's are not illegal drugs, and there's no law against cheating at sports. I suppose you could prosecute them for fraud, but you still have to catch them first.
@CoachMark

What law enforcement? Most PED's are not illegal drugs, and there's no law against cheating at sports. I suppose you could prosecute them for fraud, but you still have to catch them first.
06/14/2013 1:06:16 PM
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Professor It makes my Two year old Hemp comment right in line with Sen. McConnell. During WWII, Kentucky grew more hemp (rope) than any other state.
Professor

It makes my Two year old Hemp comment right in line with Sen. McConnell. During WWII, Kentucky grew more hemp (rope) than any other state.
06/14/2013 2:14:53 PM
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@KYinNC Wasn't it Gatewood Galbraith who ran for KY Governor on the legalize hemp platform?
@KYinNC
Wasn't it Gatewood Galbraith who ran for KY Governor on the legalize hemp platform?
06/14/2013 5:33:43 PM
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@professor I do not know, I live in North Carolina. Maybe somebody else knows.
@professor
I do not know, I live in North Carolina. Maybe somebody else knows.

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